'cutting at lemons for freckles' at Skippings Gallery,
co-curated by Chloë Louise Lawrence and Sophie Giller. 

“The artists were more interested in the textures of everyday life”. 
We wanted to put on a show with these twelve female artists, we told them to send what work they could, there were no restrictions, but some requests. All the artists had differing practices in terms of materials, techniques, concepts, but when the work came together in the show, we saw a few unifying themes which were re-imaginings of reality, or giving things potential new life and way to exist, and work in another way. We saw this critical approach from all the artists: each explores how we see, encounter and use things in a social context, and disrupts routine expectations of form and knowledge. 
In Djuna Barnes’s short story ‘The Diary of a Dangerous Child’, the protagonist speaks of “cutting into lemons for my freckles”, a visceral image of an attempt to remove ‘blemishes’ and ‘imperfections’ from the skin. When we make art, are we trying to therapise or improve ourselves, or the materials that go into them? Are we trying to make things a better version of themselves? 
In this show, the works involve a lot of re-making, repetition and variation, improving, and creating different versions.
The cutting of lemon seemed appropriate for the amount of slicing, trimming, splitting, and cropping in these artists’ practices, whether physically, in the sense of cutting into objects, magazines, fabrics, soaps, or dyed paper, or compositionally in terms of imagery and layers of paint, a cutting or editing process that’s harder to see. 
And this chopping and slicing of the lemon for improvement is an apt analogy for the searching and questioning and improving of both the materials of the works, and the artists themselves. By placing themselves in an ongoing critical position vis-a-vis everyday life, these artists continually examine and remake how they see, experience and absorb the world.
1. Neil Annett, ‘Why do artists make prints?’, The Kiss: or Poison Boyfriend: or Jesus’ Blood (London: Kingsgate Project Space, 2017), 15.
2.  Djuna Barnes, ‘The Diary of a Dangerous Child’, The Lydia Steptoe Stories (London: Faber & Faber, 2019).
Sophie Giller
Sophie Giller
Hannah Dinsdale
Hannah Dinsdale
Lydia Brockless, Sophie Birch, Maisie Maris
Lydia Brockless, Sophie Birch, Maisie Maris
Saucy Sez
Saucy Sez
Nancy Allen
Nancy Allen
Georgia Fraser
Georgia Fraser
Chloë Louise Lawrence, Sophie Birch
Chloë Louise Lawrence, Sophie Birch
Chloë Louise Lawrence, Saucy Sez, Maisie Maris
Chloë Louise Lawrence, Saucy Sez, Maisie Maris
Maisie Maris
Maisie Maris
Hannah Dinsdale, Maisie Maris
Hannah Dinsdale, Maisie Maris
Jazz Grant
Jazz Grant
Lydia Brockless
Lydia Brockless
Chloë Louise Lawrence
Chloë Louise Lawrence
Nancy Allen
Nancy Allen
Sophie Birch
Sophie Birch
Georgia Fraser, Jessie Stevenson, Maisie Maris, Jazz Grant
Georgia Fraser, Jessie Stevenson, Maisie Maris, Jazz Grant
Maisie Maris
Maisie Maris
Jazz Grant
Jazz Grant
Jazz Grant, Saucy Sez, Maisie Maris
Jazz Grant, Saucy Sez, Maisie Maris
Nancy Allen
Nancy Allen
Lydia Brockless
Lydia Brockless
Jessie Stevenson
Jessie Stevenson
Fran Mollett
Fran Mollett
Lydia Brockless, Maisie Maris, Sophie Birch
Lydia Brockless, Maisie Maris, Sophie Birch
Georgia Fraser
Georgia Fraser
Maisie Maris
Maisie Maris
Nancy Allen
Nancy Allen
Hannah Dinsdale
Hannah Dinsdale
Sophie Birch, Maisie Maris
Sophie Birch, Maisie Maris